The Great Astrolabe

The Great Astrolabe is one of the most exquisite items in museum collections at the University of St Andrews. Created by master craftsman Humphrey Cole in 1575, and widely considered to be his greatest work, the large brass piece is the most imposing of the many scientific instruments that Cole made by hand in his … Continue reading The Great Astrolabe

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Watch your step: the curse of the ‘PH’

Set against a backdrop of cathedral ruins, picturesque beaches, and the world’s oldest golf course, it is immediately apparent that studying at the University of St Andrews is nothing short of unique. Among the many features that set the University apart are its student traditions, a handful of which date back to its early history. … Continue reading Watch your step: the curse of the ‘PH’

A Big Thank You to our Volunteers

Across the UK, the 1st-7th June 2018 is Volunteers’ Week. For us in MUSA, it's a time to say thank you for the fantastic contribution our volunteers make to the work we do here. Throughout the year, our student volunteers work at the reception desk, welcoming visitors, conducting hourly checks of the galleries, making craft activities … Continue reading A Big Thank You to our Volunteers

Fridjtof Nansen: Explorer, Scientist, Humanitarian, and Rector.

Fridtjof Nansen is an individual you need to know about. A Norwegian visionary, explorer, pioneer, diplomat, humanitarian, champion, artist, and scholar, Nansen had a hunger for adventure and a quest for knowledge, venturing into uncharted territory time and time again. He held a Nobel Peace Prize, several world records, and to top it all off, … Continue reading Fridjtof Nansen: Explorer, Scientist, Humanitarian, and Rector.

Letters from America: D’Arcy Thompson’s Remington 12

Volunteer MUSA blogger, Morag Allan Campbell, writes about one of MUSA's intriguing objects in Gallery 3: D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson's typewriter. When D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson heaved his typewriter onto his desk sometime in the 1920s, the era of mechanised writing was well underway.  Printmakers and inventors had been messing around with the idea since at least … Continue reading Letters from America: D’Arcy Thompson’s Remington 12

Intricate Shapes: the Intriguing World of 19th Century Crystallography

Volunteer MUSA blogger, Anna Venturini writes about the development in the field of crystallography in the 19th century. When I was a child, geology ranked third in the list of my strongest passions, right after astronomy and palaeontology. I used to collect any sort of crystals and minerals I could get hold of, especially during … Continue reading Intricate Shapes: the Intriguing World of 19th Century Crystallography

The Seafaring Art of Barbara Rae CBE RA

In our latest post, volunteer blogger Adam Polánek writes about the renowned Scottish artist, Barbara Rae CBE RA. I had never been to Scotland prior to my studies in St Andrews. Growing up in central Europe, to me Scotland was Robert Burns’ poetry (in translation), Trainspotting, bright-coloured postcards of the highlands, and textbook excerpts describing … Continue reading The Seafaring Art of Barbara Rae CBE RA

St Andrews and the Blackstone

Between May Dip and post-exam soakings, the month of May is lively with student traditions. MUSA volunteer blogger, Selena Putri, tells us about an examination tradition that has (mercifully!) died out since St Andrews’ foundation. Please note that this article has hyperlinks embedded that you can follow for more information. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s … Continue reading St Andrews and the Blackstone