Through Lightning and Landslides: Women in Earth Science

This summer's Geology Interns were given the opportunity to create an exhibition in the foyer of the Irvine Building (home to the School of Geography and Sustainable Development). This blog post is written by one of the interns, Zoe Voice, who talks us through what they put together – 'Through Lightning and Landslides: Women in … Continue reading Through Lightning and Landslides: Women in Earth Science

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The Bell Pettigrew Museum: A Victorian Natural History Museum

Have you ever seen the wonders of the Bell Pettigrew Museum? Collections Trainee, Louise Hanwright takes you through some of the highlights of this highly praised collection. As we’ve closed MUSA’s doors until Autumn 2019 we think it would be a good time to share some of the “treasures and wonders” of the Bell Pettigrew … Continue reading The Bell Pettigrew Museum: A Victorian Natural History Museum

A.R. Wallace: Naturalist, Collector and Co-Founder of Evolution Theory

Ever heard of Charles Darwin? What about A.R. Wallace? Although he is the lesser-known of the two, A.R. Wallace made significant contributions to the field of natural science and the theory of evolution. Volunteer MUSA blogger, Vanessa Silvera, writes about his life and work, and where you can find his personal collection of taxidermy birds … Continue reading A.R. Wallace: Naturalist, Collector and Co-Founder of Evolution Theory

The Missing Link: Dura Den Fossil Fish

To this day I remember when my dad took me to explore Barrandov, a Czech area known for its contribution to the evolutionary theory. Hiking among sandstone, our path was paved by several fossil trilobites, just lying there, as if forgotten or discarded. I bent down to take one home and, for the first time … Continue reading The Missing Link: Dura Den Fossil Fish

The Parliament Hall Chair

By Vanessa Silvera Among the hundreds of artifacts in the University of St Andrews’ museum collections, there is a sophisticated polished oak chair dating back to the mid-seventeenth century. One of the most intriguing objects within the university’s heritage collection, The Parliament Hall Chair (c. 1640s-60s) is an emblem of quality craftsmanship and Scottish history. … Continue reading The Parliament Hall Chair

Fridjtof Nansen: Explorer, Scientist, Humanitarian, and Rector.

Fridtjof Nansen is an individual you need to know about. A Norwegian visionary, explorer, pioneer, diplomat, humanitarian, champion, artist, and scholar, Nansen had a hunger for adventure and a quest for knowledge, venturing into uncharted territory time and time again. He held a Nobel Peace Prize, several world records, and to top it all off, … Continue reading Fridjtof Nansen: Explorer, Scientist, Humanitarian, and Rector.

Letters from America: D’Arcy Thompson’s Remington 12

Volunteer MUSA blogger, Morag Allan Campbell, writes about one of MUSA's intriguing objects in Gallery 3: D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson's typewriter. When D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson heaved his typewriter onto his desk sometime in the 1920s, the era of mechanised writing was well underway.  Printmakers and inventors had been messing around with the idea since at least … Continue reading Letters from America: D’Arcy Thompson’s Remington 12

Intricate Shapes: the Intriguing World of 19th Century Crystallography

Volunteer MUSA blogger, Anna Venturini writes about the development in the field of crystallography in the 19th century. When I was a child, geology ranked third in the list of my strongest passions, right after astronomy and palaeontology. I used to collect any sort of crystals and minerals I could get hold of, especially during … Continue reading Intricate Shapes: the Intriguing World of 19th Century Crystallography